Overview

In this Suggested Path, students investigate how musicians often serve as voices for the various racial, gendered, generational, and class communities they represent. The path begins with lessons examining how Chuck Berry,  the Beach Boys, and The Who each uniquely spoke for youth culture in the 1950s and 1960s. Students then learn about Latino, African, Italian, and Native American communities through lessons on Richie Valens, Muddy WatersFrank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Link Wray. Lessons on Iggy Pop, The MC5, James Brown, Parliament-Funkadelic, and N.W.A. examine how new music trends arose from working-class communities and disenfranchised neighborhoods. Finally, students encounter how artists such as Aretha Franklin, Joni Mitchel, Carole King, Mary Wells, and Kesha have spoken towards women’s issues as they have developed over the decades.

Lessons

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Chuck Berry

Grades: High, Middle
Subjects: General Music
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The Sound of the Suburbs

Grades: High
Subjects: Social Studies/History
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The Who’s Generation

Grades: High, Middle
Subjects: ELA, Social Studies/History
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The Sound of Blue Collar Detroit

Grades: High
Subjects: Social Studies/History
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The Birth of Latino Rock

Grades: High, Middle
Subjects: General Music
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The Blues and the Great Migration

Grades: High
Subjects: Social Studies/History, STEAM
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Italian-American Vocalists Before Rock and Roll

Grades: High
Subjects: Social Studies/History
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The Indigenous Roots of Rock and Roll

Grades: AP/Honors/101, High
Subjects: Social Studies/History
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Soul Music and the New Femininity

Grades: High
Subjects: ELA, General Music, Social Studies/History
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Female Singer-Songwriters in the Early 1970s

Grades: High, Middle
Subjects: Social Studies/History
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“Praying” and the #MeToo Movement

Grades: High, Middle
Subjects: General Music, Social Studies/History